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Strategy Name Strategy Type(s) Year Funding Amount Funding Source Features at a Glance
Cuyahoga County Invest in Children Pre-K Program
In 2007, Cuyahoga County's broader Invest in Children effort created the Universal Pre-Kindergarten program, targeting children aged 3-5. With funding from public and private sources, this initiative focuses on making early childhood education accessible through scholarships that are provided based on family need. In 2017, it received $10 million from County Executive in addition to the annual budget of $4.7 million as well as $12 million from its private fundraising campaign to expand the program. The county plans to expand the program until 70-75% of eligible 3- to 5-year-olds are enrolled in prekindergarten. As of 2024, the program has created roughly 3,000 child care slots in Cuyahoga County. Sources: Cuyahoga County Department of Health and Human Services Cuyahoga County Office of Early Childhood  Case Western Reserve University - Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development North Carolina Early Childhood Foundation 
  • Expansion
    • Public Pre-K
    2007 $26.7 million
    In 2007, Cuyahoga County's broader Invest in Children effort created the Universal Pre-Kindergarten program, targeting children aged 3-5. With funding from public and private sources, this initiative focuses on making early childhood education accessible through scholarships that are provided based on family need. In 2017, it received $10 million from County Executive in addition to the annual budget of $4.7 million as well as $12 million from its private fundraising campaign to expand the program. The county plans to expand the program until 70-75% of eligible 3- to 5-year-olds are enrolled in prekindergarten. As of 2024, the program has created roughly 3,000 child care slots in Cuyahoga County. Sources: Cuyahoga County Department of Health and Human Services Cuyahoga County Office of Early Childhood  Case Western Reserve University - Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development North Carolina Early Childhood Foundation 
    Preschool Promise
    Preschool Promise—funded by Montgomery County, the City of Dayton, and local philanthropists—is a nonprofit organization that helps young children get ready for kindergarten; it "promises" one year of affordable, high-quality preschool for all four-year-olds in the county. Established in 2016, Preschool Promise partners with families, providers, and community leaders to ensure that quality early childhood experiences are accessible from the prenatal period to age five, particularly for Black children and children from lower-income families. The nonprofit has partnered with over 120 licensed preschool and child care sites, which collectively care for and educate over 3,000 preschoolers each year.  In 2016, voters in the City of Dayton approved a 0.25% earned income tax increase to support Preschool Promise, which went into effect in 2017. The eight-year levy, which has raised an estimated $11 million annually, passed with 54% of the vote.  LEARN MORE: Preschool Promise Sources: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education
    • Dedicated Funding Streams & Financing
      • Taxes
      2016 $11 million annually
      Approved a 0.25% earned income tax increase to support Preschool Promise, a nonprofit that partners with over 120 licensed preschool and child care sites across the county which collectively care for and educate over 3,000 preschoolers each year.
      Preschool Promise—funded by Montgomery County, the City of Dayton, and local philanthropists—is a nonprofit organization that helps young children get ready for kindergarten; it "promises" one year of affordable, high-quality preschool for all four-year-olds in the county. Established in 2016, Preschool Promise partners with families, providers, and community leaders to ensure that quality early childhood experiences are accessible from the prenatal period to age five, particularly for Black children and children from lower-income families. The nonprofit has partnered with over 120 licensed preschool and child care sites, which collectively care for and educate over 3,000 preschoolers each year.  In 2016, voters in the City of Dayton approved a 0.25% earned income tax increase to support Preschool Promise, which went into effect in 2017. The eight-year levy, which has raised an estimated $11 million annually, passed with 54% of the vote.  LEARN MORE: Preschool Promise Sources: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education
      Ohio Workforce and Program Analysis Platform
      Since 2007, the Ohio Child Care Resource & Referral Association (OCCRRA) has been the state’s workforce registry and learning management system for early care and learning professionals. OCCRRA provides professional development and technical assistance to early childhood and K-12 professionals, along with support to parents and the community. The Ohio Professional Registry (OPR) is Ohio’s workforce registry information system. It captures data about early childhood and K-12 professionals in a variety of roles and settings and serves as a comprehensive data repository for employment, professional development, education and credentials. OCCRRA created the Workforce and Program Analysis Platform (WPAP), which converts OPR data and Ohio Department of Job and Family Services records into anonymized, aggregated dashboards. The dashboards allow for the review and analysis of workforce and program turnover, churn, and retention in early childhood education across multiple variables.  In December 2020, Congress passed the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021. On May 17, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine signed Senate Bill 109, which allowed these funds to be used to support verified early childhood professionals. As a result, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) instituted Hero Pay, which provides bonuses of up to $3,000 to eligible child care professionals. WPAP was able to demonstrate that Hero Pay correlated with greater retention of participating early learning providers. Most states and the District of Columbia require enrollment in a registry for anyone participating in federal or state-subsidized programs or services (i.e. TEACH, WAGE$, QRIS, Scholarship, Apprenticeship, etc.).  Ohio, among others, relied on workforce registries to support ECE compensation efforts. Learn more: Workforce and Program Analysis Platform (WPAP) Sources: OCCRRA 2022 Annual Report (2022). Ohio Child Care Resource and Referral Association. Powerful ECE Registry Data is Key to Informing Workforce Compensation Policy and Strategies. (2022). National Workforce Registry Alliance.
      • Infrastructure to Support Early Childhood Systems
        • Data Systems
        2007
        Since 2007, the Ohio Child Care Resource & Referral Association (OCCRRA) has been the state’s workforce registry and learning management system for early care and learning professionals. OCCRRA provides professional development and technical assistance to early childhood and K-12 professionals, along with support to parents and the community. The Ohio Professional Registry (OPR) is Ohio’s workforce registry information system. It captures data about early childhood and K-12 professionals in a variety of roles and settings and serves as a comprehensive data repository for employment, professional development, education and credentials. OCCRRA created the Workforce and Program Analysis Platform (WPAP), which converts OPR data and Ohio Department of Job and Family Services records into anonymized, aggregated dashboards. The dashboards allow for the review and analysis of workforce and program turnover, churn, and retention in early childhood education across multiple variables.  In December 2020, Congress passed the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021. On May 17, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine signed Senate Bill 109, which allowed these funds to be used to support verified early childhood professionals. As a result, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) instituted Hero Pay, which provides bonuses of up to $3,000 to eligible child care professionals. WPAP was able to demonstrate that Hero Pay correlated with greater retention of participating early learning providers. Most states and the District of Columbia require enrollment in a registry for anyone participating in federal or state-subsidized programs or services (i.e. TEACH, WAGE$, QRIS, Scholarship, Apprenticeship, etc.).  Ohio, among others, relied on workforce registries to support ECE compensation efforts. Learn more: Workforce and Program Analysis Platform (WPAP) Sources: OCCRRA 2022 Annual Report (2022). Ohio Child Care Resource and Referral Association. Powerful ECE Registry Data is Key to Informing Workforce Compensation Policy and Strategies. (2022). National Workforce Registry Alliance.
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        Demographics Link copied!

        Demographics Data Scorecard

        State population

        11,756,058 Source U.S. Census, 2022

        Rural %

        23.7% Source U.S. Census, 2020

        Urban %

        76.3% Source U.S. Census, 2020

        Number of children 0–4

        673,707 Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

        Poverty levels - children 0—8 below 200% poverty

        41% Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

        Median family income among households with children

        $80,500.00 Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

        Unemployment rate

        4.2% Source U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, December 2022

        Unemployment rate of parents

        5% Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

        Children under age 6 with all available parents in the labor force

        69% Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

        Children living in households with a high housing cost burden

        22% Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

        Child Population by Race and Ethnicity Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

        Race and Ethnicity

        • American Indian and Alaska Native (.5%)
        • Asian (3%)
        • Black or African American (15%)
        • Hispanic or Latino (7%)
        • Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (.5%)
        • Two or more races (5%)
        • White, not Hispanic or Latino (70%)
        Year 2023 2022 2021 2020 2019
        Governor R R R R R
        State House R R R R R
        State Senate R R R R R

        Early Childhood Education Programs Link copied!

        Early Childhood Education Programs Source: NIEER 2023

        Public Pre-K Program Name

        Early Childhood Education (ECE) Program Source: NIEER 2023

        Universal or Targeted Pre-K Policy

        Targeted Pre-K Policy (3- and 4-Year-Olds) Source 2023

        Early Childhood Education Programs (3-Year-Olds) Source: NIEER 2023

        Programs

        • Percent of 3-Year-Old Children Enrolled in Public Early Childhood Education Programs (2%)
        • 3-Year-old Children Enrolled in Head Start (9%)
        • Other/None (89%)

        Early Childhood Education Programs (4-Year-Olds) Source: NIEER 2023

        Programs

        • Percent of 4-Year-Old Children Enrolled in Public Early Childhood Education Programs (10%)
        • 4-Year-old Children Enrolled in Head Start (10%)
        • Other/None (80%)

        Workforce Link copied!

        2017–2019 Median Hourly Wages Source CSCCE 2018, 2020

        Role

        • Child Care Workers
          $10.31 (2017, adjusted)
          $10.65 (2019)
        • Preschool Teachers
          $12.34 (2017, adjusted)
          $13.06 (2019)
        • Preschool or Child Care Center Directors
          $19.46 (2017, adjusted)
          $20.77 (2019)

        Funding Sources Link copied!

        Federal and State Early Childhood Education Funding (in Millions) Source First Five Years Fund, 2022

        Funding Source

        • Head Start and Early Head Start Funding ($368.2)
        • CCDBG & Mandatory Funds ($315.6)
        • CCDBG State Match ($25.1)
        • CCDBG COVID Relief Allocations - CARES, CRRSE, ARPA (CCDF & Stabilization) ($1700)
        • State-Funded Pre-K ($60.2)
        • MIECHV ($7.7)
        • IDEA Part C ($23)
        • IDEA Part B, Sec 619 ($19.8)
        • TANF Early Learning and Care ($423.3)