Policy Strategies & Innovations Link copied!

Innovation Name Innovation Type Innovation Subtype Features at a Glance Strategy Summary
Child Care Provider Wage Boost Program Workforce Pay Increases

Wage boost program offers up to $50,000 per provider to cover cost increases associated with either 1) increasing the hourly wages of existing employees, or 2) hiring new employees to meet increased child care demands

The Child Care Provider Wage Boost Program, funded in 2023 by the American Rescue Plan Act, helps eligible child care service providers with funding to bolster and preserve their existing programs in the form of a wage boost for early educators. This funding allows providers to retain or hire new employees at competitive rates. Providers who are approved for the program will be able to submit reimbursement requests to cover cost increases associated with either 1) increasing the hourly wages of existing employees, or 2) hiring new employees to meet increased child care demands.  

A total of $1 million in funding is available for eligible providers, including up to $50,000 over two years per provider. The program will reimburse wage boost costs at 100% in the first year and 50% in the second year, but only up to the grant cap of $50,000.

LEARN MORE: CHILD CARE PROVIDER WAGE BOOST PROGRAM

Sources:

City of Scranton. (2023). ARPA Childcare Service Provider Grants.

City of Scranton. (2023). Notice of Funding Opportunity.

Philadelphia Beverage Tax Dedicated Funding Streams Soda Tax

Soda Tax generated $79 million in its first year, creating 2,000 pre-K seats

In 2017, Philadelphia implemented a sweetened beverage tax to fund the city's Pre-K program. The tax charges distributors of sugar-sweetened beverages 1.5 cents per ounce. In its first year, it generated nearly $79 million in revenue, creating 2,000 pre-K slots. From 2017 to 2022, the tax generated $409 million for the city. Pre-K programs received $158.1 million, or 38.6% of that revenue.

Learn More/Source: Philadelphia Case Study
ECE Apprenticeship Program Workforce Apprenticeships

State-funded program

In 2017, Pennsylvania established the Early Childhood Education Apprenticeship Program, a career pathway that combines college coursework, coaching, and on-the-job learning assessments. Participants can transition from a Child Development Assistant certification to receive an associate degree and/or a bachelor's degree in Early Childhood Education while working in an early childhood classroom. Each apprentice works with a peer coach who provides onsite coaching and mentorship. The program is funded through the 1199c Training & Upgrading Fund. Employers can support apprentices through a combination of credit-bearing on-the-job learning, classroom instruction, mentorship, and credit for prior learning, and employers are expected to provide incremental wage increases as apprentices advance in their training.

Learn More: The Pennsylvania Key

Sources:

The Pennsylvania Key. (n.d.). Early Childhood Education Apprenticeship.

National Center on Early Childhood Development, Teaching, and Learning. (n.d.). The Pennsylvania ECE apprenticeship program.

Child Trends. (2019). Spotlight on Pennsylvania’s Early Childhood Education Apprenticeship Program.

Early Childhood Education (ECE) Apprenticeship Workforce Apprenticeships

City partnership with local college

Since 2017, the Philadelphia Early Childhood Education Apprenticeship Program has been led by the District 1199c Training & Upgrading Fund. Partner organizations include the Community College of Philadelphia and the Delaware Valley Association for the Education of Young Children. The program supports apprentices by helping them earn college credits and participate in classroom instruction, on-the-job training, and mentorship. It receives public workforce development funding under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. The Training Fund began developing its apprenticeship model in 2015, and the organization produces guides for replication.

Learn more: District 1199C Training and Upgrading Fund

Sources:

Early Childhood Action Collective. (n.d.). Philadelphia Early Childhood Education Apprenticeship Program. EditSign

District 1199C Training and Upgrading Fund. (n.d.). Program Replication Tool Kit.

Pennsylvania’s Enterprise to Link Information for Children Across Networks Infrastructure Systems Data Systems

Early Childhood Integrated Data System

Pennsylvania’s Enterprise to Link Information for Children Across Networks (PELICAN), created in 2006 by Pennsylvania’s Department of Public Welfare and Department of Education, is the state’s early childhood integrated data system. PELICAN links data on care, education, and workforce services for all of PA’s early learning and education programs (e.g., Head Start, Family Visiting, Pre-K, etc.). It also provides demographic, program, workforce, and individual data by request and data-sharing agreement. Individual data is deidentified through common identifiers. For public use, the Office of Child Development and Early Learning has used PELICAN to create Early Learning Dashboards using demographic and program data related to certification and licensing, early intervention, family engagement, integrated programs, children eligible vs. children served, location density, subsidized child care, and more.

Learn More: Pennsylvania’s Enterprise to Link Information for Children Across Networks (PELICAN)

Sources:
Holman, D., Pennington, A., Schaberg, K., and Rock, A. (2020). Compendium of Administrative Data Sources for Self-Sufficiency Research. Washington, DC: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services..
PDG B-5 TA Center. (2021). State Highlight: How Pennsylvania State Leaders Used Data to Distribute CARES Act Funds Equitably During the COVID-19 Pandemic.
LiBetti, A. & Fu, R. (2022). A State Scan of Early Learning Assessments and Data Systems. New America.

Office of Integrated Data for Evidence and Action Infrastructure Systems Data Systems

Integrated Data System

Philadelphia’s Office of Integrated Data for Evidence and Action was created in 2022 to host the city’s integrated data system. The system collects, stores, links administrative records on demographic, program, individual data on social services across multiple city programs (e.g., birth records, health records, foster care, pre-K, early intervention) and agencies (e.g., Education, Early Childhood, Housing). The private individual-level data is matched and deidentified using an internal matching system. The data system is used internally for policymaking and research in the city and has strong ties to Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy (AISP) at the University of Pennsylvania.

The Office of Integrated Data for Evidence and Action was created by Mayor James Kenney’s Executive Order 2-22. But the city's integrated data system—formerly known as both CARES and KIDS—had existed since 2002, funded by seed grants from William Penn Foundation and by a collaboration among the City of Philadelphia, the School District of Philadelphia, and the University of Pennsylvania.

Learn More: The Office of Integrated Data for Evidence & Action
Download This Table

Demographics Link copied!

Demographics Data Scorecard

State population

12,972,008 Source U.S. Census, 2022

Rural %

23.5% Source U.S. Census, 2020

Urban %

76.5% Source U.S. Census, 2020

Number of children 0–4

681,354 Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

Poverty levels - children 0—8 below 200% poverty

36% Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

Median family income among households with children

$88,300.00 Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

Unemployment rate

3.9% Source U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, December 2022

Unemployment rate of parents

6% KIDS COUNT, 2021

Children under age 6 with all available parents in the labor force

68% Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

Children living in households with a high housing cost burden

25% Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

Child Population by Race and Ethnicity Source KIDS COUNT, 2021

Race and Ethnicity

  • American Indian and Alaska Native (0.5%)
  • Asian (4%)
  • Black or African American (13%)
  • Hispanic or Latino (14%)
  • Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (0.5%)
  • Two or more races (4%)
  • White, not Hispanic or Latino (65%)
Year 2023 2022 2021 2020 2019
Governor D D D D D
State House R R R R R
State Senate D R R R R

Early Childhood Education Programs Link copied!

Early Childhood Education Programs

Public Pre-K Program Name

Pennsylvania Pre-K Counts Program (PAPKC) Source: NIEER 2023

Public Pre-K Program Name

Pennsylvania Head Start Supplemental Assistance Program (PAHSSAP) Source: NIEER 2023

Public Pre-K Program Name

Ready to Learn (RTL) Source: NIEER 2023

Public Pre-K Program Name

Pennsylvania Kindergarten for Four-Year-Olds and School-Based Pre-K (K4 and SBPK) Source: NIEER 2023

Universal or Targeted Pre-K Policy

Targeted Pre-K Policy (3- and 4-Year-Olds) Source 2023

Universal or Targeted Pre-K Policy

Targeted Pre-K Policy (3- and 4-Year-Olds) Source: NIEER 2023

Universal or Targeted Pre-K Policy

Targeted Pre-K Policy (4-Year-Olds) Source: NIEER 2023

Universal or Targeted Pre-K Policy

Targeted Pre-K Policy (4-Year-Olds) Source: NIEER 2023

Early Childhood Education Programs (3-Year-Olds) Source: NIEER 2023

Programs

  • Percent of 3-Year-Old Children Enrolled in Public Early Childhood Education Programs (10%)
  • 3-Year-old Children Enrolled in Head Start (7%)
  • Other/None (83%)

Early Childhood Education Programs (4-Year-Olds) Source: NIEER 2023

Programs

  • Percent of 4-Year-Old Children Enrolled in Public Early Childhood Education Programs (20%)
  • 4-Year-old Children Enrolled in Head Start (8%)
  • Other/None (72%)

Workforce Link copied!

2017–2019 Median Hourly Wages Source CSCCE 2018, 2020

Role

  • Child Care Workers
    $10.16 (2017, adjusted)
    $10.69 (2019)
  • Preschool Teachers
    $13.59 (2017, adjusted)
    $13.96 (2019)
  • Preschool or Child Care Center Directors
    $21.78 (2017, adjusted)
    $23.40 (2019)

Funding Sources Link copied!

Federal and State Early Childhood Education Funding (in Millions) Source First Five Years Fund, 2022

Funding Source

  • Head Start and Early Head Start Funding ($343.8)
  • CCDBG & Mandatory Funds ($285.3)
  • CCDBG State Match ($42.2)
  • CCDBG COVID Relief Allocations - CARES, CRRSE, ARPA (CCDF & Stabilization) ($1600)
  • State-Funded Pre-K ($318.3)
  • MIECHV ($11.8)
  • IDEA Part C ($23.2)
  • IDEA Part B, Sec 619 ($21.6)
  • TANF Early Learning and Care ($701.9)